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MOUNT CALVARY COMMUNITY CHURCH CEMETERY
(Fairfax County)
Bbehind the church parking lot at 6731 Beulah Street (Route 613)
South Alexandria, Virginia USA
Original Information from Volume 5 of the Gravestone Books
 
Mount Calvary Community Church Cemetery is situated behind the church parking lot at 6731 Beulah Street (Route 613), near the intersection of Beulah with Fleet Drive, in the Franconia area.  The church was formerly known as Bethel Full Gospel Assembly of God Church and the cemetery has also been called Schurtz Community Cemetery.  The cemetery is divided from Beulah Cemetery (on the grounds of Calvary Road Baptist Church) by a fence and narrow road.
 
The cemetery was established about 1945 by Joseph Edward Schurtz, according to research conducted by Society members in 1987.  They reported that the graveyard was owned by William E. Schurtz and maintained in a trust arrangement established by P. V. Schurtz.  Schurtz Drive intersects Beulah Street to the northeast of the cemetery.
 
During the 1960s, burials from the eighteenth-century Talbert (Talbott) Family Cemetery (q.v.) were moved to Mount Calvary Community Cemetery to make way for construction of the Capital Beltway (Interstate highways 95 and 495).  The Talbert Family Cemetery was located near the intersection of Van Dorn Street with the Beltway.  A few old marble gravestones were moved with the burials, some of the Talbert graves are marked “unknown,” and many are marked with modern granite headstones.  At least 37 markers along the eastern fence represent the removals from the Talbert Family Cemetery.
 
The half-acre site was surveyed in 1973, 1988, 1997 and 1998.  The area is fenced and well cared for.  The survey begins in the back of the graveyard in the northeast corner.  The gravestones in this area face Beulah Street.  The grave markers were read row by row toward the street.  Clusters of markers standing near each other and far from other rows were read together.
 
No Updates from Volume 6 of the Gravestone Books